scandinaviancollectors:

Alvar Aalto. Paimio Tuberculosis Sanatorium, 1931-1932. Paimio, Finland. Picture from the roof top terrace. / Pinterest

scandinaviancollectors:

Alvar Aalto. Paimio Tuberculosis Sanatorium, 1931-1932. Paimio, Finland. Picture from the roof top terrace. / Pinterest



bobofeed:

roomonfiredesign: The Condestable’s House by Tabuenca & Leache Arquitectos in Pamplona, Spain.



rudygodinez:

Details of Pierre Chareau & Bernard Bijvoet’s “Maison de Verre”, (1932)

Unable to expel an elderly woman on the top floor, the house was engraved underneath an existing apartment. As such, the house uses skeleton frame steel construction allowing a free plan and the use of omnipresent lightweight materials, such as glass and glass block.

An interesting aspect of this house is the ubiquitous mechanical fixtures. On the ground floor was a medical suite for Dr. Jean Dalsace. This unusual circulation arrangement was resolved by a rotating screen which hid the private stairs from patients during the day, but framed the stairs at night. Other mechanical components include an overhead trolley from the kitchen to dining room, a retracting stair from the private sitting room to a bedroom, and complex bathroom cupboards and fittings.

Spatial division inside is customizable by the use of sliding, folding, and rotating screens in glass, sheet or perforated metal.

The honesty of materials, variable transparency of forms, and the juxtaposition of “industrial” materials and traditional home décor makes Maison de Verre a landmark in 20th century architecture.





jonasgrossmann:

minerals and metals research building, illinois institute of technology (1943)
iit chapel of saint saviour (1952) 





something-like-art:

Todd Eberle. Gateway Arch I, Eero Saarinen, St. Louis, Missouri, October 2001http://toddeberle.com/america.html 

something-like-art:

Todd Eberle. Gateway Arch I, Eero Saarinen, St. Louis, Missouri, October 2001

http://toddeberle.com/america.html 




Palace of Taq-i Kisra  aka Arch of Ctesiphon, 540 AD Al-Mada’in .
It is the largest brick built arch in the world. The arch was part of the imperial palace complex. The throne room—presumably under (…) the arch—was more than 30 m (110 ft) high and covered an area 24 m (80 ft) wide by 48 m (160 ft) long.
The top of the arch is about 1 meter thick while the walls at the base are up to 7 meters thick.


Palace of Taq-i Kisra  aka Arch of Ctesiphon, 540 AD Al-Mada’in .

It is the largest brick built arch in the world. The arch was part of the imperial palace complex. The throne room—presumably under (…) the arch—was more than 30 m (110 ft) high and covered an area 24 m (80 ft) wide by 48 m (160 ft) long.

The top of the arch is about 1 meter thick while the walls at the base are up to 7 meters thick.





We could never design a building as beautiful as the trees.
— Pietro Belluschi, Architect (via thelaughteroftrees)


omnisolidatum:

Corte interna all’isolato ai Bottari in Ortigia 1997-2001, vincenzo latina

omnisolidatum:

Corte interna all’isolato ai Bottari in Ortigia 1997-2001, vincenzo latina



archivemodernarchitecture:

Athénée Léonie de Waha, Liège, Belgium, 2011. © Nicolas Grospierre 

source